• Policy Brief

Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Property Administration in Senegal: Challenges, and Perspectives

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This policy brief explores the complex yet crucial role of inter-institutional collaboration in the effective mobilization of property taxes. While many factors contribute to the performance of property tax systems, the aspect of collaboration between different institutions is often overlooked but remains vital.

In francophone African countries, including Senegal, the central government predominantly manages property tax administration, with the revenues generated being partially or wholly allocated to local governments. This structure necessitates close cooperation among various government bodies, especially those responsible for the cadastre, taxation, and collection processes. This policy brief delves into the collaborative dynamics among the key players involved in property taxation in Senegal, assessing how these inter-institutional relationships impact overall tax administration performance.

Additionally, it offers strategic recommendations aimed at enhancing these collaborative frameworks and practices. The goal is to fortify the involvement and influence of local governments within the property tax chain, thereby improving efficiency and effectiveness in property tax mobilization.

Authors

Policy Lead

Research Lead

Research Officer

Publication Details

Camille Barras

Policy Lead

Camille Barras is the Policy Lead for the Local Government Revenue Initiative (LoGRI). Her areas of work and interest encompass public governance and administration, subnational governance, intergovernmental relations and state-society relations – and their connection with taxation. She is also interested in questions related to the effectiveness and evolution of international development as a field, in evidence generation and uptake as well as in research methods (quantitative, mixed, evaluation). She completed, in 2023, a PhD at the University of Cambridge, investigating the effects of decentralization on political attitudes and behaviours, and holds academic qualifications in political science, public policy and law. Previously, she worked during seven years at the intersection of practice and research, mainly in the international development sector across a variety of organizations and projects in West/North Africa, South/East Asia and Europe. Among others, she worked for a local governance project at UNDP, was a project manager for impact evaluations at the Center for Evaluation and Development and consulted for the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation.


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Colette Nyirakamana

Research Lead

Dr. Colette Nyirakamana is Research Lead for the LoGRI program, and Senior Research Associate at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. Prior to joining LoGRI, Colette worked as program lead of the African Property Tax Initiative  (APTI) at the International Centre for Tax and Development, where she was in charge of supporting APTI-funded researchers, leading research projects, engaging with key stakeholders and advising governments in the design of property tax reform efforts. Her research focuses on local finances with particular emphasis on the institutional and political factors that create favourable and unfavourable conditions for effective revenue mobilization. She holds a doctoral degree in Comparative Public Policy from McMaster University in Canada


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Marie-Reine Mukazayire

Research Officer

Marie-Reine is a researcher and recent graduate from the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. In her studies, she specialized in Global Development and Global Justice. She is interested in the ways sub-Saharan francophone African states can build capacity to ensure better service delivery while facilitating human-centric sustainable growth. 


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