• Working Paper

Determinants of the Impact of the Use of the MoMo App and Impact on Taxpayer Compliance

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This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the factors influencing the adoption and impact of the MoMo App on tax compliance among property taxpayers. It explores the various elements that determine the effectiveness of the MoMo App in enhancing taxpayer compliance and its adoption by the taxpayers. Additionally, it examines the implications of the MoMo App on the management of administrative data, providing valuable insights into the app’s role in streamlining tax administration processes.

Authors

Research Lead

Damas Hounsounon

Jonas Fassinou

Doctoral Fellow

Publication Details

Colette Nyirakamana

Research Lead

Dr. Colette Nyirakamana is Research Lead for the LoGRI program, and Senior Research Associate at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto. Prior to joining LoGRI, Colette worked as program lead of the African Property Tax Initiative  (APTI) at the International Centre for Tax and Development, where she was in charge of supporting APTI-funded researchers, leading research projects, engaging with key stakeholders and advising governments in the design of property tax reform efforts. Her research focuses on local finances with particular emphasis on the institutional and political factors that create favourable and unfavourable conditions for effective revenue mobilization. She holds a doctoral degree in Comparative Public Policy from McMaster University in Canada


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Nicolas Orgeira Pillai

Doctoral Fellow

Nicolas Orgeira Pillai is a Doctoral Fellow with LoGRI. His research focuses on local revenue mobilisation, with a particular interest in property taxation and tax compliance. Through the use of impact evaluation approaches and quantitative analysis, his work aims to support tax administrations in implementing state-building tax reforms that improves governance and the relationship between the government and the citizens. His projects also relate to tax administration, gender and taxation, and the informal economy. He holds a master’s in economics at the University of Toronto and is a doctoral candidate in Economics at the University of Sussex.


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